Blog: Words and images

Catbird on plant

I guess this is a story about how my many hours hiking in search of wildlife to photograph have conditioned me to link specific sounds to specific animals.

A few months ago I was hiking through a field near the edge of a forest when I heard something that sounded like a cat mewing in the underbrush. “Gray Catbird,” I told myself, then turned the camera toward the sound in hopes of getting a shot of the catbird if it popped to the top of a plant.

A few minutes later, the source of the sound appeared. …

Daylily up close

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Julie, my wife, does a great job having our house surrounded by flowers during the spring and summer months (although in recent summers some of the backyard spots formerly occupied by flowers now have tomatoes, basil, parsley and peppers).

The variety of flowers provides a nice opportunity for me to work on my macro (or close-up) photography. I’ve photographed lilies, daisies, zinnias, geraniums, marigolds, impatiens, petunias, tulips, irises and daylilies without ever leaving the yard.

Most of my photos show full flowers or even multiple flowers. …

Passing

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There’s nothing quite like a day at Keeneland, the historic horse race track in Lexington, Ky., and the subject of my photo of the week.

You’ve got the excitement of thoroughbreds racing past crowds lining the rail along the track as they cheer their horse in hopes that the bet they placed turns into a winner. You’ve got the beautiful scenery, with flowers blooming during the April spring meet and leaves turning during the October fall meet. There’s excellent food and drink. And the entire track is surrounded by picturesque horse farms, making the drive to and from the track a scenic one past the rolling hills dotted by grazing thoroughbreds. 

A bridge and a camera

Walking across the Brooklyn Bridge is still one of my favorite things to do in New York. The bridge, the subject of my featured gallery for August, is about a mile and a quarter long (it was, by far, the world’s longest suspension bridge when it was completed in 1883) with a wide pedestrian walkway above traffic. More than 4,000 pedestrians and 3,000 bicyclists cross the bridge each day, although I’ve been on the bridge on some nice-weather weekend days when it seems like all 7,000 walkers/cyclists are on it at the same time.