Blog: Words and images

Eastern Comma

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It’s Sunday, so it’s time for another photo of the week and the story behind the image.

There are some butterflies that I can easily identify. The monarch definitely fits in that category, as do a variety of swallowtails like the tiger, the spicebush, the black and the zebra.

But then there are some butterflies that send me to Google in search of an accurate identification.

This is one of those “Google butterflies.” It’s an Eastern Comma butterfly, a somewhat small butterfly (wingspan is about two inches) often found close to water — lakes, swamps, rivers, etc. …

Female Towhee

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It’s Sunday, so it’s time for another photo of the week and the story behind the image.

With some bird species, it’s all but impossible to tell a male from a female when the bird is perched nearby. The plumage of a male is pretty much identical to the plumage of a female. Song Sparrows, Blue Jays, Titmice, Chickadees and Cedar Waxwings are among the many varieties of birds that fit this description.

With some other species, the male and female are very similar but the female’s plumage color is more muted, or the female lacks one marking visible on the male. …

Grasshopper

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It’s Sunday, so it’s time for another photo of the week and the story behind the image.

I remember learning the fable about the ant and the grasshopper in grade school. The grasshopper spent the summer singing in the sun while the ant worked hard to store food for the winter. When winter came, the grasshopper begged the ant for food. The ant replied, “you sang all summer, you can sing all winter.” The fable was followed by a moral along the lines of “Idleness brings want.”

The best in the world

Each August I spend a few days watching and photographing the world's best tennis players competing in the Western & Southern Open Tennis Tournament in Cincinnati. And each September I use the new photos as my featured gallery.

The Western & Southern Open is about as close to a Grand Slam tennis tournament as an event can get. It's one of only nine tournaments in the world where the top men and women play simultaneously at the same site: the four majors (Australian Open, French Open, Wimbledon and the U.S. Open), and combined ATP Masters 1000 and WTA Premier events in Rome, Madrid, Miami and Indian Wells, Calif., along with Cincinnati.